The Strange - and Expensive - Things Tenants Leave Behind

AFS Team·21 July 2014·4 min read
The Strange - and Expensive - Things Tenants Leave Behind
You would think that tenants would take all of their possessions with them when a tenancy comes to an end, but that's not always the case. Lettings agents Benham & Reeves says they continue to be surprised at what tenants do leave behind – including, in one case, a Range Rover. The keys had been left with the building's porter and when the vehicle's owner was contacted he told the letting agents to keep it. The firm's director, Marc von Grundherr, said: “The Range Rover isn't the only vehicle that a tenant has left behind but it was the most expensive. So when you think you've seen it all something will come along and surprise you." Items left behind by a tenant In the case of the Range Rover, the owner eventually sent someone to collect it, but other expensive items that have been left behind include cases of knives, a flatscreen Bang & Olufsen TV, skis, ski clothes and an American fridge freezer - even though the property already had a fridge. That tenant also left a treadmill. However, tenants also leave behind bizarre items such as a toupee that was found in a biscuit tin, an entire window frame – complete with glass, left on a bed – and a case of champagne. One tenant also left fake Grecian columns and statues, which they had cemented into the floor! One letting agent admits that when they went to visit an unfurnished flat when the tenancy had finished, they were stunned to find that the tenant had left everything behind including furnishings, designer clothes, paintings and even Swarovski figures. These possessions were eventually given to a charity, as were the designer clothes left behind in another property by a shopaholic. London's prime rental market to boom Meanwhile, a new analysis of the prime London property market has revealed that nearly half of tenants are living there due to a job at a location; and this number is due to increase as the city increasingly attracts firms from around the world. As result, says real estate agency Savills, the demand for prime rental property in London will rocket. Demand from tenants is coming from those working in insurance and banking, a traditionally strong sector for delivering tenants, but now increasing numbers are in new technologies. Savill's Matthew Salvidge said: “London is one of the world's important global commerce centres and we have a diverse range of tenants looking to relocate there from all business sectors."